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Tarte Tatin

Tarte Tatin


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This apple tart is famous and is a symbol in French cuisine, today there are many derivations of this classic apple tart, we have tatin tarts with candied fruit, we have salty tatin tarts of all sizes and shapes. The story of this tart is really funny, its name comes from the two Tatin sisters, Stéphanie (1838-1917) and Caroline Tatin (1847-1911) who owned a restaurant, which still exists today «hôtel-restaurant Tatin», located in front stations in Sologne. One Sunday morning, while preparing a tart, one of the sisters burns the tart and, intending to recover the composition, places the apple filling in a tray and covers it with a sheet of tart. The result is excellent and much appreciated by hunters who were the basic customers of the restaurant so that the tart out of "mistake" becomes the emblem of the restaurant and one of the emblems of French cuisine, if you taste the tart you will understand why, apples have a completely caramelized texture in advance, the tart on top remains crispy but soaked with apple flavor…. a wonder. The conclusion is drawn by yourself in life, simple things out of chance often become emblematic… or maybe it's something more than that, the passion for culinary art has no limits, always other searches, other experiences, other attempts, even when we try to straighten a failure can bring us wonderful things. I drew a more particular conclusion, which emerges from this simple fact as well as from a lot of other experiences: not what we do in life gives us the definition of People but HOW we do what we do in life, any small thing would be it gives us the definition of People. Work done with passion, selflessness, responsibility and always looking for an improvement defines us, whether we are lawyers, architects, chefs, teachers… I had the opportunity to know some trades in life and to interfere with hundreds if not thousands of people and I can say that I met special people who changed the world with a small grain of novelty in whatever field they were in… but let's get back to our pie.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • ¾ cup white sugar
  • 3 large Granny Smith apples - peeled, cored, and quartered
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 9-inch unbaked pie crust (see footnote for recipe link)

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C).

Coat a 10-inch oven-proof skillet with butter. Sprinkle sugar evenly over the top of the butter.

Place apple quarters, rounded sides down, on top of the butter and sugar in a circular pattern.

Place skillet over medium-high heat and cook until butter melts and sugar dissolves and begins to caramelize. Continue to cook until apples soften and caramel begins to brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat.

Sprinkle work surface with flour and roll pie dough into an 11-inch circle. Pinch edge to create a ruffle around crust.

Place crust on top of apples and tuck in edges around apples.

Bake in the preheated oven until crust is golden brown, about 20 minutes. Allow to cool for 5 minutes. Place a plate over the top of the pan and carefully invert to release tarte from the pan. Scrape any remaining apples stuck to the pan back on top of crust.


Contents

The tarte Tatin was created accidentally at the Hôtel Tatin in Lamotte-Beuvron, Loir-et-Cher, 169 km (105 mi) south of Paris, in the 1880s. [1] The hotel was run by two sisters, Stephanie and Caroline Tatin. [2] There are conflicting stories concerning the tart's origin, but the most common is that Stéphanie Tatin, who did most of the cooking, was overworked one day. She started to make a traditional apple pie but left the apples cooking in butter and sugar for too long. Smelling the burning, she tried to rescue the dish by putting the pastry base on top of the pan of apples, quickly finishing the cooking by putting the whole pan in the oven. After turning out the upside down tart, she was surprised to find how much the hotel guests appreciated the dessert. In an alternative version of the tart's origin, Stephanie baked a caramelized apple tart upside-down by mistake, regardless she served her guests the unusual dish. [3] Whatever the veracity of either story, the concept of the upside down tart was not a new one. For instance, pastry chef Antonin Carême already mentions glazed spilled cakes adorned with apples from Rouen or other fruit in his Royal Parisian pastry chef (1841).

The tarte became a signature dish of the Hotel Tatin. Historians and gourmets have argued whether it is a genuine creation of the Demoiselles (Misses) Tatin, or the branding of an improved version of the "tarte solognote", a traditional dish named after the Sologne region which surrounds Lamotte-Beuvron. Research suggests that, while the tarte became a specialty of the Hotel Tatin, the sisters did not set out to create a "signature dish" they never wrote a cookbook or published their recipe they never even called it tarte Tatin. That recognition was bestowed upon them by Curnonsky, a famous French author and epicure, as well as Maxim's Parisian restaurant after the sisters' deaths. [4]

One of the legends has it that Louis Vaudable, the owner of Maxim's, once tasted it and was smitten. As he described it:

“I used to hunt around Lamotte-Beuvron in my youth and had discovered, in a very small hotel run by elderly ladies, a marvelous dessert listed on the menu under tarte solognote I questioned the kitchen staff about its recipe, but was sternly rebuffed. Undaunted, I got myself hired as a gardener, but three days later, I was fired when it became clear that I could hardly plant a cabbage however this was long enough to pierce the secrets of the kitchen I brought the recipe back and put it on my menu under 'tarte des demoiselles Tatin'. " [5]

In reality, Vaudable was born in 1902 the sisters retired in 1906 and died in 1911 and 1917 whereas Maxim's was purchased by the Vaudable family in 1932.

Originally, the Tatin pie was made with two regional apple varieties: Reine des Reinete Pippins), and Calville. [6] Over the years, other varieties have tended to displace them, including Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Fuji and Gala.

Tarte Tatin can also be made with pears, quinces, peaches, pineapple, tomatoes, [7] other fruit, or vegetables, such as onion.

The Tarte Tatin should be made with puff or shortcrust pastry.

Variations of this recipe can also be made as turnovers, where the pastry is not only cooked upside-down but also inverted.


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Followed A Cook from LAs suggestions on cooking and apples and puff pastry (DuFour) came out perfect. I wanted a more winter treat, so I added some cinnamon and leftover cranberry sauce to my caramel (did half dark brown and half white sugar) and tossed in a few whole cranberries with the apples. The cranberries provided a nice tartness. Served with barely sweetened whipped cream on the side. Very tasty. So easy and everyone loved it.

Simple and delicious! I used 5 gala apples and cooked on the stove top for 25 min and then the oven for 10 minutes before adding the puff pastry and baking for 13 min. In the end I think it is all about watching for the carmelization you desire on the apples. My guests love it! Impressive quick make again.

Amazeballs! So delicious and so easy! I used 7 granny smiths in my dutch oven and cooked / baked for significantly less time than was indicated. I followed the LA cook & # x27s recommendations (15 & # x27 on the stove, 30 & # x27 in the oven with pastry on the whole time) but next time I would do even less. The apples were a bit too soft, although not apple sauce yet. Maybe 10 & # x27 on the stove and 20-25 & # x27 in the oven?

Two things- 1. The cook from LA is correct. A bit less cooking on the apples and more on the crust. 2. I always use Golden Delicious apples which are not too tart, and most importantly, have the right composition to deliver the correct texture. I have seen recipes that also suggest blending a variety of apples, but prefer a more uniform consitency.

Excellent cooked apples longer in caramel syrup on stove and then with pastry on top directly in oven for 30 min

Made this for Canadian Thanksgiving and it turned out fabulous. Used honey crisp apples, about 9 medium ones. Used a peeled and cored apple half as the button in the middle. Tossed the apples wedges with 2tsp vanilla and zest of a lemon. Used salted butter to coat the 8 inch Le Creset skillet and white sugar (will try brown next time). Caramelization took longer than expected and I never did get the darker hue I wanted. I had the apples on the stove for 25 minutes then popped skillet into the oven for 10 minutes. I then added the cold puff pastry before placing back in the oven for 23 minutes. Turned out perfect! Loved the flavor and the turn out was fine. Will be making this throughout apple season!

An hour of cooking left the apples mushy. I scraped them off to serve on french toast tomorrow.

after reading the many reviews, i made this using granny smith apples, and tossed them with about a teaspoon of vanilla. i also added about 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, and 1/4 tsp of nutmeg to the sugar before adding it to the pan. i used the times as listed, and mine came out perfect. it sat for a few hours before serving, but my oven was hot, so i placed it in the oven for about ten minutes before turning it out onto a plate. that was tricky, probably because of the weight of the cast iron pan! my guests, and i, loved it!

Easy and delicious. How you handle your puff dough makes a big difference. Keep it cold! Not too sweet and lovely to serve. I nearly over caramelized the sugar but added a touch of water to stop it from browning further and all was fine. Let mine cool for 2 hours and reheated briefly to soften the apples before turning out onto a plate. Pastry was crispy. Will make again, very easy.

This recipe is on the right track, but has some major flaws. Not sure how everyone is getting such great results here. The cooking times are much too long. I have made this recipe twice and both time my apples were over cooked to the point of becoming apple sauce, meanwhile my pastry was under cooked and not fully browned. when i invert the tart the tops of the apples stick to the bottom of the pan and i end up scraping them off and placing them back on the tart as best i can. i have a new oven and a dial thermometer to give a more accurate reading of the temperature, so i know my oven temp is not the problem. i came up with a solution. in the first phase, while the butter, sugar, and apples are still on the stove top, i only cook them 15 minutes to get the caramelization started. 20 minutes results in the sugar starting to burn. then, instead of doing 20 min in the oven before covering with the pastry, i place the pastry over the apples before i put it in the oven and bake it only for 30 minutes. this gives the apples 10 minutes less time in the oven and the pastry 10 minutes more time in the oven, resulting in firmer apples that hold together and a more evenly browned pastry.

I use this recipe for either apple or pear. I usually sprinkle slivered almonds in the pan after the butter melts. I usually add a bit of cognac or such after the fruit is in the pan and then let the fruit caramelize slowly as it cooks out the alcohol. I make one or the other version every Thanksgiving or Christmas. Wonderful


Contents

The tarte Tatin was created accidentally at the Hôtel Tatin in Lamotte-Beuvron, Loir-et-Cher, 169 km (105 mi) south of Paris, in the 1880s. [1] The hotel was run by two sisters, Stephanie and Caroline Tatin. [2] There are conflicting stories concerning the tart's origin, but the most common is that Stéphanie Tatin, who did most of the cooking, was overworked one day. She started to make a traditional apple pie but left the apples cooking in butter and sugar for too long. Smelling the burning, she tried to rescue the dish by putting the pastry base on top of the pan of apples, quickly finishing the cooking by putting the whole pan in the oven. After turning out the upside down tart, she was surprised to find how much the hotel guests appreciated the dessert. In an alternative version of the tart's origin, Stephanie baked a caramelized apple tart upside-down by mistake, regardless she served her guests the unusual dish. [3] Whatever the veracity of either story, the concept of the upside down tart was not a new one. For instance, pastry chef Antonin Carême already mentions glazed spilled cakes adorned with apples from Rouen or other fruit in his Royal Parisian pastry chef (1841).

The tarte became a signature dish of the Hotel Tatin. Historians and gourmets have argued whether it is a genuine creation of the Demoiselles (Misses) Tatin, or the branding of an improved version of the "tarte solognote", a traditional dish named after the Sologne region which surrounds Lamotte-Beuvron. Research suggests that, while the tarte became a specialty of the Hotel Tatin, the sisters did not set out to create a "signature dish" they never wrote a cookbook or published their recipe they never even called it tarte Tatin. That recognition was bestowed upon them by Curnonsky, a famous French author and epicure, as well as Maxim's Parisian restaurant after the sisters' deaths. [4]

One of the legends has it that Louis Vaudable, the owner of Maxim's, once tasted it and was smitten. As he described it:

“I used to hunt around Lamotte-Beuvron in my youth and had discovered, in a very small hotel run by elderly ladies, a marvelous dessert listed on the menu under tarte solognote I questioned the kitchen staff about its recipe, but was sternly rebuffed. Undaunted, I got myself hired as a gardener, but three days later, I was fired when it became clear that I could hardly plant a cabbage however this was long enough to pierce the secrets of the kitchen I brought the recipe back and put it on my menu under 'tarte des demoiselles Tatin'. " [5]

In reality, Vaudable was born in 1902 the sisters retired in 1906 and died in 1911 and 1917 whereas Maxim's was purchased by the Vaudable family in 1932.

Originally, the Tatin pie was made with two regional apple varieties: Reine des Reinete Pippins), and Calville. [6] Over the years, other varieties have tended to displace them, including Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Fuji and Gala.

Tarte Tatin can also be made with pears, quinces, peaches, pineapple, tomatoes, [7] other fruit, or vegetables, such as onion.

The Tarte Tatin should be made with puff or shortcrust pastry.

Variations of this recipe can also be made as turnovers, where the pastry is not only cooked upside-down but also inverted.


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Tarte Tatin

The recipe I chose to feature today is all about one of France’s most beloved and cherished desserts: Tarte Tatin. The French also call this dessert tarte des Demoiselles Tatin (the tart of two unmarried women named Tatin).

What is tarte Tatin?

A quintessentially French dessert, tarte Tatin is an upside-down apple tart (actually a sweet upside-down cake) made by coating the bottom of a shallow baking dish with butter and sugar, then apples and finally a pastry crust.

While baking, the sugar, and butter create a delicious caramel that becomes the topping when the tart is upturned onto a serving plate. Tarte Tatin is what many Americans believe to be an upside-down apple pie. But it’s, in fact, a bit more than that.

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There is one imperative for eating Tarte Tatin, which is meticulously observed: tt must be served warm, so the cream melts on contact. To the French, a room temperature Tarte Tatin is not worth the pan it was baked in.

What is the origin of the famous French apple tart?

There are numerous versions of the history of the tarte Tatin, the most popular being the following. In 1898 two French sisters, Carolina (1847-1911) and Stephanie Tatin (1838-1917) accidentally created this beloved pastry. The sisters lived in Lamotte-Beuvron, a small countryside township in the Loire Valley of France they owned and ran the Hotel Tatin.

The elder sister Stephanie was an exceptionally fine cook, though not known as one of the smarter persons in town. However, her ability in the kitchen was unmatched in the valley. Stephanie’s forte was an apple tart, served impeccably crusty, caramelized and which melted in the mouth.

One hectic day, Stephanie had attempted to make a customary apple pie, but so they said she left the apples cooking in butter and sugar too long, and they were beginning to burn. Trying to recover the dish, she basically covered the top of the pan with pastry dough and tossed the whole creation into her oven. The upside-down tart that resulted from this blunder was a huge hit with the hotel’s guests, and ultimately became a signature dish for the hotel.

In fact, it was such a hit that French author and gourmet Maurice Edmond Sailland, better known by his nom de plume Curnonsky and considered to be France & # 8217s & # 8220Prince of Gastronomy & # 8221 was the original person to dub the dessert the tarte Tatin , after its creator.

This dessert gained its popularity when the famed Maxim’s Restaurant in Paris, France put it on their menu. According to various historians, when word of this innovative gastronomic delight reached Paris, Maxim’s owner determined he had to have this tarte Tatin recipe. He allegedly sent a cook / spy, masquerading as a gardener, to Lamotte-Beuvron to ascertain the secret. The spy was successful, and it has been on the menu of that renowned restaurant ever since.

Some of the best culinary creations have come from kitchen mistakes. Such is the case with the fabled tarte Tatin, no matter which story is true, the tarte Tatin is delicious, so don't be overwhelmed by the lengthy instructions and multi-step process. It & # 8217s is worth the effort at least once each apple season.

How to make tarte Tatin

Baking a beautiful tarte Tatin is not complicated. It is, one might say, as easy as apple pie when keeping to a few simple rules. The choice of dough is a personal preference. Some French tarte Tatin recipes use simple store bought processed dough or even puff pastry. I, however, go for the more authentic / traditional taste and use a shortcrust pastry. When it comes to food, I am a traditionalist. I like mine little processed, and cook everything from scratch.

Today, you can unearth the dish in most Parisian patisseries and restaurants. There are other accounts of the tarte Tatin & # 8217s origin, and historians note that upside down tarts, including apple pies, had been created and served by other French patissiers, including Antonin Carème who mentions a similar dish in his 1841 book Le Patissier Royal Parisien. Nonetheless, the story of the Tatin sisters is the most widely acknowledged depiction of the conception of this French classic.

The original tarte Tatin was made with two local French apples, Reine des Reinettes (King of the Pippins) and / or Calville. Over the years, other cheaper varieties became more frequently used. For North American cooks, Granny Smith, Jonathan or Golden Delicious varieties are the top choices for dessert.

Luckily for us, this happy mistake ended up being so delicious that it & # 8217s since grown in popularity and spread far and wide to dessert lovers the world over.

If you love food and food history in its original settings, then think about visiting the town of Lamotte-Beuvron. Lamotte-Beuvron is less than two hours from Paris, and here you will find the original Hotel Tatin and its restaurant.

Here and at other restaurants in Lamotte-Beuvron, they only serve authentic versions of the original Tarte Tatin. Over the years, the apple tarte Tatin recipe has evolved, improved by the contributions of successive cooks and better cookware. I invite you to retrace its history, better yet, come enjoy it in its birthplace, and treat yourself to the fantastic scenery that is the birthplace of this quintessential French dessert.

Along with creme brulée, tarte Tatin is probably one of my favorite French desserts. Who can resist these soft and deliciously caramelized apples anyway?

This recipe is validated by our culinary expert in French cuisine, Chef Simon. You can find Chef Simon on his website Chef Simon & # 8211 Le Plaisir de Cuisiner.


Recipe for 4 people

    the oven & agrave 190 & degC. Cut and cut each apple into 8 pieces.
  1. In a saucepan, whisk together the powdered sugar and butter. Heat without stopping to whisk. When the mixture starts to harden, add the apples and mix. Extend cooking for 5 minutes.
  2. Arrange the apple slices in the mold & aggravate pie. Cover with the broken piece by inserting the edges into the mold. about 20 minutes. D & eacutemouler imm & eacutediatement & agrave la fin de la cuisson. Serve hot or cold with a spoonful of fresh cream or a scoop of ice.