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United Airlines Tried to Capitalize on the Wendy’s Chicken Nugget Tweets and Failed So Hard

United Airlines Tried to Capitalize on the Wendy’s Chicken Nugget Tweets and Failed So Hard


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United Airlines was brutally roasted on Twitter after they tried to emulate Wendy’s marketing success

Perhaps they realized a free United Airlines flight could be a bit of a… drag.

By now, we all know about the modern-day social media hero named Carter Wilkerson — the Nevada teenager who epically asked Wendy’s for free chicken nuggets for a year and was told to surpass 18 million retweets to receive his prize.

Wilkerson didn’t quite reach his goal, but with a little help from Ellen DeGeneres, he did break the record for the greatest number of retweets (3.4 million and counting) in Twitter history, so Wendy’s gamely honored the deal anyway.

[email protected] is now the most retweeted tweet of all-time. That’s good for the nuggets, and $100k to @DTFA. Consider it done. #nuggsforcarter pic.twitter.com/k6uhsJiP4E

— Wendy's (@Wendys) May 9, 2017

All’s well that ends well, right? United Airlines tried to ride on the coattails of this social media success (perhaps looking for some ramped-up positive publicity) and were trolled by skeptical Twitter users. Come on, United: Don’t you know the law of diminishing returns?

It ended up being yet another public relations misstep for a company that has been dragged through the mud quite a bit since the April 2017 incident where a doctor was unwillingly dragged off an overbooked United Airlines flight.

— Jack Mull (@J4CKMULL) May 10, 2017

@united @carterjwm @Wendys Yo @United how many retweets to not get assaulted by you on my next flight?

— Siqi Chen (@blader) May 11, 2017

@united @carterjwm @Wendys Hey @carterjwm. See the GIF for advice. pic.twitter.com/KfBl0xvpEW

— Boom Fantasy (@BoomDFS) May 11, 2017

— Brian Reynolds (@brianreynolds13) May 10, 2017


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.


'This feels like a closed case': Ilhan Omar joins Democrats saying Derek Chauvin is guilty before the verdict is handed down and demands 'transformational change' to fix 'repeated assaults' by cops

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation.

'The case to me feels like a closed case where it shouldn't be really even questioned whether there will be an acquittal or a verdict that doesn't meet the scale of the crime that was committed,' the Minnesota representative told press in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on Tuesday afternoon.

Omar's comments came before the jury has reached a verdict, and after the judge in Chauvin's case said politicians commenting on the trial could be grounds for the defense to appeal a potential guilty verdict.

The progressive representative said that she trusts the trial to be 'dignified and just'.

'As the community is still on edge and feels that we are a community that has experienced injustice over and over again, [they trust] that this might actually be the turning point,' Omar continued. 'And so we are prayed up, we are holding onto one another for support, we are checking in on one another. And hopefully this verdict will come soon and the community can start the process of healing.'

Omar's comments were made from the spot where 20-year-old Daunte Wright (left) was killed. Kimberly Potter, 48, (right) was arrested Wednesday and charged over Wright's killing during a traffic stop last week

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he is praying for the 'right verdict' in George Floyd trial as he called the evidence 'overwhelming' in a series of extraordinary comments that come as the jury begins its second day of deliberations in Chauvin's case.

'I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. 'I wouldn't say that unless the jury was sequestered now.'

The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family.

'I don't think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,' White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at her press briefing. 'He was conveying what many people are feeling across the country, which is compassion for the family.'

She indicated Biden could have more to say after the verdict is rendered. Biden is weighing an address to the nation, according to reports.

'I expect that he will weigh in more, further, once there is a verdict and I'm not going to provide additional analysis on what he meant,' Psaki said, declining to clarify if Biden wanted Chauvin found guilty on all charges.

She defended Biden's comments, saying the president had closely followed the trial, has gotten close to the Floyd family and waited to speak until the jury was sequestered.

Biden called Floyd's brother Philonise on Monday after the jury went behind closed doors for their deliberations on the charges of murder and manslaughter against Chauvin. The president noted he waited until the jury was sequestered to make the call and to comment on the case.

'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'

Biden has denounced Floyd's death but had stopped short of weighing in on the trial until now. His extraordinary comments come as the 12-member jury began its second day behind closed doors and the nation waits for their decision.

The president's comments also come amid growing anger among Republicans for Rep. Maxine Waters' calling for Chauvin to be found guilty and for Black Lives Matter protesters to be 'more confrontational'.

The California Democrat sparked outrage by travelling to Minneapolis on Saturday and urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' if Chauvin was acquitted. She later said she was not urging violence and accused Republicans of twisting her words. She was back on Capitol Hill Tuesday, presiding over the House Financial Services Committee, which she chairs. Democrats have defended her remarks.

Waters' comments over the weekend, on the eve of the jury retiring to consider its verdict, may have handed Chauvin's defense grounds for appeal and the turning over of any guilty verdict. The judge on Monday said 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case.'

The White House also has stood by Waters.

'The congresswoman has provided further clarification of her own remarks and I would certainly point you to that,' Psaki said on Tuesday.



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